Tag Archives: Texas

“A good writer possesses not only his own spirit but also the spirit of his friends.” — Friedrich Nietzsche

Sometimes all you need is a little change.

Change is a funny thing. Though it can be both bad and good, we humans often fear it. Whether you are about to go to college or take a gigantic trip, you fear the unknown ahead. If you lose someone close to you, you fear the uncertainty that their absence brings.

This week (H)our Stories experienced a whole lot of change. For the first time we welcomed a stranger into our midst (okay, not so much a stranger as a good friend). Mathew Roscoe is an LA-based film Editor, Animator, and VFX-Artist who writes and directs whenever he can. This all around awesome dude was more than up to the challenge of writing an (H)our Story.

As there were suddenly three writers, we embraced the change in front of us — in this exercise, each writer provided one prompt to be shared by everyone. That’s right! We all used the same prompts. They were:

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U-Haul by TOMMERVIK

  1. Siblings (provided by Roscoe)
  2. U-haul (provided by Jacob)
  3. Edward Albee (provided by ZB)

A testament to the power of imagination, the outcomes were totally different. Even when basic circumstances of the stories were similar, such as the case with ZB and Roscoe, the stories would be a chore to confuse.

In Roscoe’s H Street Era, a grandfather ejects his grandson & granddaughter from his childhood home. The physical texture of the piece calls back to Roscoe’s filmmaker roots while the struggles of the two grandchildren allows it to stand as a story on its own.

In ZB’s Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf?, a brother and sister try to confront the realities of their past as they clean out their parent’s home. The eponymous play works as an emotional swivel, allowing them to venture beyond their childhood nostalgia.

Jacob differed from the norm, allowing his characters to have previously packed up the Uhaul. In Ninety Miles Out, two brothers experience road trouble due to their own staggering stupidity. The subtlety of the piece allows the audience to groan along with the brothers, knowing that their mistakes are common amongst us all.

To see more of Roscoe’s work check out his film reels here. He’s a pretty impressive man.

As always, check out our archives for more (H)our Stories or reach out to us in the comments if you have a story inspired by our prompts! We would love to feature more from our friends.

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“Style Means the Right Word. The Rest Matters Little.” -Jules Renard

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Homeless Man, by Elize Bezuidenhout

The last two weeks have been full of challenges for both writers. This week was no different. While each of the six stories written over the last two weeks was unique in its attempt to utilize the prompts given, it wasn’t until this week that both writers felt like their story used each prompt to their full effect.

Jacob wrote Metropolis Razing, a heavy piece that captures the complexity and difficulty of life on the streets. His prompts:

  1. Non-White Main Character
  2. The Smell of Skin
  3. Times Square

For a totally different tone, ZB’s Casual Dating adds mystery to a bad date & shows how romance has evolved over the years.

  1. Modern Dating
  2. A Budding Politician
  3. Bari, Italy
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Tinder Boy, by Ambrus Gero

For a look at the last two week’s stories, look here and here.

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July 9th, 2014

Hi All!

Sorry about the abrupt hiatus. Between job interviews, vacations, and life we just were unable to find time to write together. But we’re back now! Hopefully there won’t be anymore long breaks.

 

This week ZB had to form a story with the prompts: Rap Music, a Male Paraplegic, and Someone else on a Date. Here’s the end result: A Rhythm. A Rhyme.

Jacob used the prompts Texas, Starting Something New, and Murder Mystery to write the great Car Radio.

Enjoy!

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